Regulation And Safety

FCA under pressure to recall Chrysler Pacificas for potential stalling problem

The Center for Auto Safety is asking NHTSA to open an investigation and recall the Chrysler Pacifica, which the group says represents an "unreasonable risk" because of a stalling problem.


The industry's second chance to be first in safety

U.S. automakers failed to get out in front of the safety push of the 1960s, and paid a big price. They have a chance to take a different approach in the era of autonomous driving.

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Sent early Monday mornings, this newsletter contains a summary of key stories from our weekly edition.

MORE REGULATION/SAFETY NEWS RECALLS
How critical is the EV tax credit?

Salespeople would be sad to see the federal tax credit on plug-in electric vehicles disappear. But they're not so sure it's necessary to keep customers interested in EVs.

Dude, where's my flying car?

After a century of failed efforts to make vehicles that can soar above gridlocked traffic, the idea that such contraptions are "just around the corner" might not be so far-fetched.

A century of promises

Here's just a taste of a century's worth of unfulfilled flying-car promises. A few are fictional, but every one of them is a promise of a future that as yet hasn't come to be.

COMMENTARY: Michael Dunne
Will Baidu beat Waymo?

Consultant Michael Dunne said he is betting on China's Baidu, known in the West as the Google of China, to outmanuever Waymo in the self-driving wars.

Software startup helps maintain shared vehicles

Stratim, a fleet management software startup, is looking to meet the anticipated need for timely vehicle service and maintenance as transportation moves from private ownership to shared mobility.

Private sector plays for overtime on NAFTA

Amid rising fears that President Donald Trump may fulfill his campaign threat to scrap the North American Free Trade Agreement, the business community is looking to stretch out the renegotiation process.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Law center wrong about add-ons

The “Auto Add-ons Add Up” study published by the National Consumer Law Center last month is too biased to be accorded the weight of empirically derived, credible research.

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