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Only Musk can get away with this

Burning through $1 billion per quarter, or $8,000 per minute? Anyone but Elon Musk would be waving a white flag or contemplating leaving the country (planet).

On recalls, Honda goes the extra mile

It took a while for Honda to recognize the scope of its problem with bad Takata airbag inflators, but since it did, the company has led the way in finding affected vehicles and getting their owners to come in for repairs.


Costs sink Sommer, but ZF committed to autonomous

Boardroom unease over ongoing acquisitions just brought down ZF's CEO. But the parts giant knows it must press on to be a true global autonomous vehicle competitor.

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MORE MANUFACTURING NEWS OEM/SUPPLIERS EXECUTIVES
Industry right-sizes its stocks

Automakers have worked off a yearlong surplus of inventory and enter the busy December selling season with stocks slightly below normal for this time of year.

ZF CEO's 'reckless' buying spree led to his departure

The departure of ZF CEO Stefan Sommer shows that politics and entrepreneurism rarely are a good match. Sommer turned ZF into the world's second-largest supplier but his global expansion ambitions were considered "reckless" by the head of the foundation that owns the supplier.

ZF CEO Sommer steps down after losing power struggle

ZF said CEO Stefan Sommer is leaving the company. Sommer's departure likely signals the end of an expansion strategy that drove the German supplier's $12.4 billion acquisition of TRW Automotive, creating the industry's second-largest supplier.

Why the auto industry needs a new toolbox

As the auto industry perches on the edge of a drastic technological disruption, its mechanical engineering prowess is no longer enough. The autonomous and connected future is going to require a new set of tools.

Intel chief says chip edge goes to Intel

The war over the self-driving car chip got a little personal last week at the Los Angeles auto show, where Intel CEO Brian Krzanich started naming names and calling out the competition.

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