Opinion

KEITH CRAIN

Fields lesson: CEO has many masters

Mark Fields is a nice guy, but being a nice guy didn't matter. Wall Street has decided that it is not in love with automotive stocks.

JASON STEIN

After Fields, is anyone safe?

Mark Fields managed the F-150 pickup transformation, repositioned the Lincoln brand, restored European profits, renegotiated labor agreements and started a movement to the world of mobility. That he was fired begs the question: Is anyone safe?

EDITORIAL

Vision in leadership is important. So is focus.

Ford has installed a “visionary” as its CEO. But without enough focus to go with that vision, Ford may end up just spinning its wheels.

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COMMENTARY: Jason Stein
After Fields, is anyone safe?

Mark Fields managed the F-150 pickup transformation, repositioned the Lincoln brand, restored European profits, renegotiated labor agreements and started a movement to the world of mobility. That he was fired begs the question: Is anyone safe?

COMMENTARY: Keith Crain
Fields lesson: CEO has many masters

Mark Fields is a nice guy, but being a nice guy didn't matter. Wall Street has decided that it is not in love with automotive stocks.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Auction safety is not that simplistic

It is inappropriate to chastise the NAAA and any of its members that serve the national dealer base with a high regard for safety and integrity, a reader writes.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Fields never had Mulally's leeway

With all due respect to Bill Ford, it is likely that Mark Fields was unable to sharpen his message or clarify his strategy because his board chairman didn't allow him to do either on his own.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
GM's finance focus shortsighted

A General Motors retiree is gobsmacked at recent management decisions. With finance replacing visionaries, the focus is now on share value and profit.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
EV column not based in reality

The reality is that last year, of the over 17 million new vehicles sold in the United States, 99.5% were not electric, a reader writes.

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