Converts to the Cult of Car-Sharing (Season 1, Episode 1)


In Episode 1 of Season 1 of our new podcast, “Futurismo," we set out to find people around the country who are living without the burden and convenience of car ownership.

Naturally, they are all 20-somethings living in big urban areas where it’s easy to go without a car, right?

Actually, no. We discovered busy people in rural regions and in large sprawling metropolitan areas with precious little public transportation who are doing quite nicely without a vehicle.

We found car fanatics and truck drivers and people of all ages who have gone off the car-ownership grid.

Meet these converts to the cult of car-sharing who are featured in “Futurismo.”

Are they trailblazers in the transportation future? Harbingers of a different auto industry?

Listen to the full episode above and read excerpts below.

Music licensing consultant Drew Bayers, 35, goes without a car — and lives in Los Angeles!

“When you meet someone the first time there’s always that element of surprise or astonishment when they find out, A, that I don’t have a car, B, that I don’t necessarily plan to get one ... and C, that I’ve made it work for 15 years.”

Gregg Zullo, 48, a freight broker in Portland, Ore., comes from a family with “gasoline in the blood.”

“It’s funny that as a car guy, I don’t drive a car. That’s a great conundrum. I do own a bike, but the rest of the time I use Car2Go. It seems to work out pretty well. If I were to win the lottery I’d probably get a garage full of great, fun, quirky cars, because I like them so much. But right now, for what I need and what I’m doing, a car-sharing program is perfect.”

Brian Schwartz, 24, is a business intelligence analyst at a social media security provider in Baltimore. When his grandfather wanted to get rid of a car, he offered it to Schwartz, who wasn’t interested.

“It was going to be a whole thing like I’d have to pay for parking, get insurance. There was this whole list of things that came with this freedom of having a car that I just wasn’t willing to take on at this juncture. I’ve told myself I don’t necessarily need a car for 10 years, until I’m either financially at a point where it’s a luxury I can afford or I end up moving back to the suburbs. But I’d like to remain carless as long as I could.”

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