Crossovers carry Hyundai to October record

The compact underpinnings of the revamped Tucson, pictured, will soon give a lift to Hyundai’s sibling brand, Kia, which unveiled a redesigned version of the Sportage crossover in September at the Frankfurt auto show. Photo credit: BLOOMBERG

After three months in showrooms, Hyundai’s redesigned Tucson is hitting its stride.

U.S. sales of the compact crossover doubled to 7,298 in October, narrowing its deficit to the Mazda CX-5 and Subaru Forester and suggesting Hyundai is poised for growth in a segment in which it has historically struggled. Tucson sales helped the Korean brand to a healthy month, with U.S. sales rising 20 percent to a record 60,005 vehicles.

“The strong demand for crossovers continued,” Derrick Hatami, vice president of national sales at Hyundai Motor America, said in a statement. “Hyundai provides a very competitive CUV lineup that meets the needs of most consumers.”

The compact underpinnings of the Tucson will soon give a lift to Hyundai’s sibling brand, Kia, which unveiled a redesigned version of the Sportage crossover in September at the Frankfurt auto show.

Kia reported today that its U.S. sales climbed 12 percent to 50,044 vehicles in October, led by strong results for the boxy Soul hatchback and the Optima midsize sedan.

Soul sales increased 15 percent to 12,246 and Optima sales rose 21 percent to 14,381, accounting for more than half of Kia’s sales.

“Our ability to outpace the industry without the benefit of a truck in our lineup speaks volumes about consumers discovering the new Kia,” Michael Sprague, COO of Kia Motors America, said in a statement. With the redesigned 2016 Optima now arriving in showrooms, he added, Kia expects “a strong finish to the year.”

Though October, Kia’s U.S. sales have increased 7.4 percent from the year-ago period to 526,024 and Hyundai’s sales have risen 5 percent to 638,195.

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