Cars and Concepts

Alfa's new sport sedan to get Ferrari V-6 power, report says

The new Alfa Romeo sedan, which is set to debut next week in Italy, is expected to feature a Ferrari-derived V-6 engine under the hood, Autocar reports.

The sedan, known internally as "Type 949," is expected to carry the Giulia name. It has been in development for the last few years. Until recently, very little concrete information has leaked out about the sport sedan that is aimed at resuscitating Alfa Romeo sales.

In an interview with Alfa Romeo and Maserati boss Harald Wester, Autocar reported the Type 949 will feature a rear-wheel-drive layout and will share some mechanical components with the Maserati Ghibli.

The new midsize sedan is expected to be powered by a new four-cylinder engine in base form that packs nearly 300 hp. It will replace the 1.75-liter engine in the Alfa Romeo 4C.

But the larger engine in the Alfa lineup is expected to be a V-6 that will be shared with the "New Dino," which is currently in development. Until now, the Giulia had been expected to use a 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6 from the Maserati Ghibli until now.

Wester also indicated that the new Alfa Romeo sedan will stay true to the brand's character and will not feature any self-driving technology, and that the new sedan will present a contrast to its German competition, which Wester described as clinical and cold.

The new sport sedan will be revealed on June 24 -- Alfa's 105th birthday -- at the Expo Milan in Italy. It is the first of eight all-new models that Alfa plans to introduce globally by 2018 at a cost of $6 billion.

The sedan has been delayed a number of times, with its debut pushed from 2011 to 2013 and later to 2015 as Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne, who headed Alfa Romeo at the time, took issue with the proposed car's styling.

The Giulia is expected to take on the BMW 3 series, the new Jaguar XE, the Audi A4 and the Mercedes-Benz C class when it goes on sale in the U.S. in early 2016.

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