Google plans driverless-car reports after 2nd accident in a week

SAN FRANCISCO (Bloomberg) -- Google Inc. will start to issue monthly reports on its self-driving cars, part of a push to disclose more information about the technology, following a second accident for one of the vehicles in less than a week.

The new reports summarize the project's activity, data points and any incidents involving the cars, Google said Friday.

An autonomous vehicle was rear-ended at a stoplight in Mountain View, California, on Thursday, Google said. Last weekend, another unit was hit in the same city.

There have been 13 accidents since the project began six years ago, and none have been the fault of the vehicle itself, the company said.

"We've made a lot of progress with our self-driving technology over the past six years, and we're still learning," the company said in its report for May, which includes data through Wednesday of this week. "Every day we head out onto public streets so we can keep challenging and refining our software."

Google is making its case for driverless cars with more transparency amid questions about the progress of the program, which is part of the company's X research lab.

The reports come after a shareholder asked for more information on accidents during the annual meeting at its headquarters on Wednesday.

The company also is using the website to explain how the technology works, gather information and give updates, Google said.

The information hub makes the argument that robotic cars could help address the multiple deaths caused by human-driven vehicles today.

As part of the reports, Google said it plans to give examples of situations encountered. The latest submission includes a photo of its self-driving vehicle stopped at a light and waiting after it turned green because an ambulance was approaching the intersection.

"I'm very proud of the record of our cars," co-founder Sergey Brin said during a shareholder meeting on June 3. "Our goal is to beat human drivers."

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