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Acura wants TLX to replace two sedans, and it mostly works

Acura, Honda's upscale brand, is replacing the TSX and the TL with one sedan, the TLX, which shares much of its underpinnings with the European Honda Accord.

Acura, Honda's upscale brand, is replacing the TSX and the TL with one sedan, the TLX, which shares much of its underpinnings with the European Honda Accord. Available with direct-injected engines, eight- and nine-speed automatic transmissions and four-wheel steering, the TLX is aimed at European rivals. Price ranges from $31,890 to more than $45,000, including shipping. Here are some snippets from recent test drives:

"The four-cylinder engine, while certainly capable enough, can't match the stronger punch provided by turbocharged four-cylinders found in many competing models. The TLX also features Acura's latest dual-screen electronics interface, but we've found its functionality leaves a little to be desired. And while the TLX is impressively well rounded, it can come off as a little bland compared to the more lavish or customizable designs of some rivals."

Article: Full 2015 Acura TLX Review

-- Edmunds.com

"Seats are comfortable; not as cushy as a Lexus, not as upright as something from the Germans. There are touches of wood on the center console, dashboard and door panels, but it's certainly not the richest or trendiest veneer in the class -- we'd probably give that one to the open-grain accents from Audi, whose interiors seem all-around better designed (even if you'll have to pay to get features, like dual climate control, that come standard on the Acura)."

Article: All about Acura's tech-laden mid-sizer

-- Autoweek

"In lieu of having two separate sedans, the 2.4-liter TLX and 3.5-liter TLX are tuned very differently, aimed at very different customers. The four-cylinder is vocal, engaging, and eager. Its transmission's shifts are lightning-fast, and the car is light on its feet. The TLX V6's responses, by comparison, feel dulled -- and it requires upwards of 4000 rpm for the engine to come alive. The transmission's shifts are slurred and slow, and the suspension tuning is far softer and less responsive. The car feels far heavier and less agile, and no more refined."

Article: 11 things you need to know about the 2015 Acura TLX

-- Road & Track

"Front-drive TLX models get Acura's next-generation Precision All-Wheel Steering (P-AWS), which acts in three different ways on the rear wheels. At lower speeds, the rear wheels turn in the opposite direction of the fronts to mitigate understeer and make the car feel a little more agile. At higher speeds, all wheels turn in the same direction for increased stability and the rears toe in slightly under braking for the same reason. In practice, the system is virtually invisible to the driver, though in brisk back-roads driving, the Acura does feel plenty willing, with positive turn-in and not much body roll."

Article: One Car Does the Work of Two

-- Motor Trend

"In our experience driving the TLX, the front-drive four-cylinder is by far the most rewarding driver's car in the lineup, with an immaculately balanced chassis and very settled, predictable handling. The V-6 feels heavy and a bit more sluggish when cornering, a feeling exacerbated by the sluggish powertrain."

Article: 2015 Acura TLX - Review

-- The Car Connection

"The chassis and ride is also superb in all models. I sailed over whoop-de-dos on backcountry roads, bounded over railroad tracks and traversed miles of uneven pavement. There was hardly a crash, bang or bump, and never once did the wheel travel reach its limit or did the platform become unsettled or choppy."

Article: Splitting The Difference Makes The Difference

 -- Autoblog

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