This week: Register for FREE subscriber access to autonews.com

Ford unveils a seamless plan for 2015 F-150

When Ford started designing the new F-150 in late 2010, it held a contest among suppliers and chose Magna's design. Ford will offer the sliding rear window on XL and XLT versions of the F-150 as a $300 option for SuperCab and SuperCrew models.

Ford Motor Co. last week demonstrated its “seamless sliding rear window” feature developed by Canadian supplier Magna International Inc. for the new 2015 Ford F-150 pickups.

The current F-150 sliding glass rear windows, like those on many pickups, require three panes of glass and a support structure of plastic frames and sealing material that is complex to assemble and vulnerable to quality glitches and leakage.

When Ford started designing the new F-150 in late 2010, it held a contest among suppliers and chose Magna’s design.

Ford will offer the sliding rear window on XL and XLT versions of the F-150 as a $300 option for SuperCab and SuperCrew models.

It will not be offered on Regular Cab models.

Ford's previous window design.

It will be standard on the Lariat, King Ranch and Platinum models.

Ford said the new window assembly is lighter, easier to install and less prone to leaks.

Other carmakers have taken different approaches to designing a pickup rear window that opens, including Toyota, which offers a full-sliding rear window on its Tundra.

You can reach Bradford Wernle at bwernle@autonews.com

0

Shares

ATTENTION COMMENTERS: Over the last few months, Automotive News has monitored a significant increase in the number of personal attacks and abusive comments on our site. We encourage our readers to voice their opinions and argue their points. We expect disagreement. We do not expect our readers to turn on each other. We will be aggressively deleting all comments that personally attack another poster, or an article author, even if the comment is otherwise a well-argued observation. If we see repeated behavior, we will ban the commenter. Please help us maintain a civil level of discourse.

Newsletters