GM's recall website gives incorrect information, U.S. says

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WASHINGTON -- General Motors' website set up to give consumers quick information on recalled cars and light trucks has been providing inaccurate information, the U.S. Transportation Department said.

When consumers entered a vehicle identification number to determine whether their automobile was subject to recall, some were erroneously told no, according to a statement issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration late Friday.

An error caused that message for vehicles where recalls existed and parts weren't available. NHTSA told consumers to check the GM website after 5:30 p.m. ET on Friday for accurate information.

GM said in a statement Friday that the company was making necessary changes to the site and that customers with questions should call the company's customer service line.

"We are making the necessary changes to our website so customers can identify individual VIN numbers," a spokesman said Monday. "We have made substantial progress to resolve this issue and expect it to be fully corrected this week."

GM’s existing website does not meet new NHTSA requirements that go into effect on Aug. 20, The Detroit News also reported.

The agency issued a regulation in August 2013 that requires major automakers to provide an online tool that enables consumers to search recall information by Vehicle Identification Number. The online tool must also disclose whether any recalls have not been completed.

Consumers can obtain the same information from NHTSA at safercar.gov.

Automakers sought to delay the rule by a few months but the agency formally rejected the request on Monday, the News reported.

GM has recalled nearly 29 million vehicles in North America in 2014, breaking a single-year record for most recalled cars in the United States. The company has stepped up the pace of recalls as it faces multiple investigations for its slowness in calling back 2.59 million small cars with ignition flaws linked to at least 13 deaths.

Bloomberg contributed to this report.

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