Why it pays to be the resident Corvette specialist

Automotive News | September 14, 2013 - 12:01 am EST

Stick this one in the tough-day-at-the-office file.

Steve Moore Jr., operations director at Steve Moore Chevrolet in Charlotte, N.C., spent two days at a track outside Las Vegas last month flogging the new 2014 Corvette Stingray.

He was among the first of 2,000 or so dealers, sales and service managers and other Chevy dealership personnel that will spend two days at the Corvette Sales Academy at the Spring Mountain Motorsports Ranch in Pahrump, Nev.

It's part of an unprecedented effort by Chevrolet to raise the game of its Corvette sales force. Each of the 900 Chevy dealerships that will sell the seventh-generation Vette when it hits showrooms in October must designate at least one Corvette sales specialist. (Larger-volume stores must have two.)

It's mandatory for those specialists to attend the training at a $2,000 cost to the dealership. No training, no allocation.

Moore spent time in the classroom learning the intricacies of the new Vette, such as the drive mode choices -- Eco, Weather, Tour, Sport and Track. Then he donned his helmet to test them during several hours of track time.

Moore: The 2014 Corvette "just decimates" the Porsche 911 and Boxster.

Flipping from Tour to Track mode, he says, "changes the thing from a docile sports car to a track-ready vehicle at the flip of a switch."

It gets better: Trainees also get behind the wheel of a Porsche 911 and a Boxster for comparison drives. Moore's assessment: The Corvette "by far just decimates those two cars from both a performance and price standpoint."

He returned to the dealership to download all he'd learned on his sales staff.

Just the way Chevy planned it.

Mike Colias covers General Motors for Automotive News.Mike Colias covers General Motors for Automotive News.

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