It's Chrysler vs. Chevy in the battle for post-Super Bowl buzz

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Chrysler Group once again grabbed a disproportionate share of the post-Super Bowl buzz this year with its national pep-talk commercial delivered by Clint Eastwood. (Count me among those scratching their heads at the "controversy.")

But was it the buzziest?

Not according to an ad-tracking tool created by Collective Intellect, a Boulder, Colo., marketing firm. The tool, co-sponsored by CNBC, says Chevrolet's commercials generated the most buzz among 51 Super Bowl advertisers.

Chrysler generated the second-most buzz among automakers and fourth-most overall, behind M&Ms and Doritos. Volkswagen was the only other automaker in the top 10.

The site tracks the social media universe (Twitter, Facebook and blogs) and splices the data to measure buzz while also rating advertisers on a number of categories, from funniest to most offensive.

For example, Chevy ranked No. 3 in the "funny" category overall and was tops among automakers. It also was a solid No. 2 in the "unfavorable" category that tracks negative mentions.

Those barbs might have come from Ford drivers panning Chevy's 2012 Mayan apocalypse commercial. The spot showed a group of Silverado owners surviving the world-ending cataclysm, while a Ford pickup driver "didn't make it."

Chevy also was atop the category that the site calls "the holy grail" of advertising: Getting viewers to consider an actual purchase. The site says 22 percent of the social-media mentions of Chevy contained "purchase focused language."

Whatever that is, it's a lot more than any other brand got: The closest of the 51 advertisers was Samsung's Galaxy Note tablet at 11 percent. Chrysler was third at 9 percent.

It's hard to know just how precise or meaningful these rankings are. But it's clear that Chevy is watching the scoreboard. Yesterday it put out a chest-thumping press release touting the results.

You can reach Mike Colias at mcolias@crain.com.

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