Which plant ranks as Chevy's 'Rouge'?

Many plants built Ford vehicles, but the Rouge complex in Dearborn, Mich., was the most celebrated.

Many plants built Jeeps, but the Toledo, Ohio, factory holds the most history.

Many plants built Chevys, but … what? Is there a single factory that stands out for its central role in Chevrolet history?

I'm supposed to write about Chevrolet's factories for the Oct. 31 special issue of Automotive News that will celebrate Chevrolet's 100th anniversary.

There are lots of stories I could tell:

• The Lordstown, Ohio, plant, and its role in the birth of the '60s blue-collar blues -- and its eventual turnaround in labor-management relations that led it to go to three shifts in the 1990s.

• The Fremont, Calif., plant that was shuttered, then reopened as a GM-Toyota joint venture building Novas alongside Corollas.

• The Bowling Green, Ky., plant that builds Corvettes. The sports car previously was built in Flint, Mich., and in St. Louis.

Those are all great stories. And maybe I'll tell them. But I don't yet sense that I've found the mother of all Chevy plants, the one that epitomizes the century-long glories and heartbreaks of this all-American brand.

Which one would you nominate? Is there a single factory that to you will always stand for Chevrolet? Let me know.

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