DAVID BARKHOLZ

Chrysler's parental advisory

David Barkholz is a staff reporter for Automotive News

Yo, Chrysler.

Nobody’s defending the guy who used your Twitter account to lambaste Detroit drivers with an f-bomb this week.

But fire New Media Strategies, the social media company he worked for?

Chrysler’s Ed Garsten explained the decision in a blog posted on the automaker’s media Web site Thursday. “With so much goodwill built up over a very short time, we can’t afford to backslide now and jeopardize this progress,” he wrote.

OK, I get that. But consider the vocabulary of the front man who Chrysler picked to get that ball rolling with its sensational Super Bowl commercial.

Megastar rapper Eminem, aka Marshall Mathers, is not merely friendly with expletives; he’s intimate with them. On his latest hit album, Recovery, Mr. Mathers uses the f-bomb no less than six times in the very first song, “25 to life.” I didn’t bother to count other expletives in the lyrics or look at the rest of the album.

He also dropped an f-bomb (unbleeped) during his recent Grammy Awards appearance during a duet with Rihanna.

Different context than a traffic tweet, I understand. And we get fair warning on his music. Parental advisory, explicit language — like a rash on every one of his albums.

But Eminem is now, by design, the one person that American consumers most associate with Chrysler products. That’s some progress.

25

Shares

ATTENTION COMMENTERS: Over the last few months, Automotive News has monitored a significant increase in the number of personal attacks and abusive comments on our site. We encourage our readers to voice their opinions and argue their points. We expect disagreement. We do not expect our readers to turn on each other. We will be aggressively deleting all comments that personally attack another poster, or an article author, even if the comment is otherwise a well-argued observation. If we see repeated behavior, we will ban the commenter. Please help us maintain a civil level of discourse.

Newsletters