Firm offers drivers a social media connection with their vehicles

SAN FRANCISCO -- You know everybody is jumping on the social media bandwagon when Experian Automotive's vehicle history reporting arm, AutoCheck, has figured out how to do it.

AutoCheck demonstrated at the NADA convention a new feature called Check My Ride, designed to tap into the emotional connection people have with the vehicles they own or used to own. Found at Checkmyride.com, the social media site allows consumers to log in at the site or enter it by clicking the Facebook icon and using their Facebook credentials.

After creating an account, consumers are asked community building and bonding questions such as the make and model of their current vehicle, memorable road trips and if their car has a nick name.

They are also urged to enter the vehicle identification numbers of vehicles they own or used to own. This information allows Check My Ride to plot on a map of the U.S. where the vehicle was previously registered and/or where it is registered now. The idea is for users to discuss and share information and memories about the vehicles they are fond of.

Check My Ride is now available online and will officially launch with a marketing campaign in the next few weeks, says James Maguire, senior director of marketing at Experian. It will be the history reporting company's highest profile effort to create brand awareness among consumers, he adds.

Over 12,000 dealers use Auto Check vehicle history reports and the feature could be used by dealers to start a dialog with their customers, he said.

The feature is free to consumers.

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