It's hard to lose track of parked or stolen vehicles on the auction lot

I was at an auto auction recently. When I looked at the hundreds of cars and trucks parked at the facility, I wondered if a vehicle was lost or stolen would anybody realize it.

Apparently so.

Here's a true story about some not so smart crooks who allegedly tried to steal vehicles from a Manheim auto auction near Daytona Beach, Fla.

According to a press release by the Volusia County Sheriff's department, five young men ranging in age from 17 to 21, tried to steal a 2010 Nissan Murano, two 2010 Maximas and a 2009 Infiniti G37 coupe.

Shortly after, 3 a.m. on Sept. 1, auction guards spotted the moving vehicles and saw them line up at an exit. The drivers revved the engines as if prompting the guards to open the gates, the sheriff's department says. The guards didn't comply, and they called the cops. The drivers drove around the lot apparently loo king for another way out. The driver of one Maxima plowed the car into a parked 2007 Nissan Pathfinder.

Finally the men abandoned the vehicles, jumped a fence and hopped into a car driven by an accomplice. The accomplice's car, by the way, belonged to his parents.

Deputies tried to pull the getaway car over but the driver kept going. Using a helicopter to track the car and stop sticks to deflate its tires, the law prevailed.

The five defendants were from Orlando and were transferred to a county jail or a juvenile detention center. All have been charged with commercial burglary, four counts of auto theft, criminal mischief and other charges.