The Brownback amendment goes social

On May 11, auto sales trainer Grant Cardone was cooling his heels at an airport. He posted a photo of the terminal airport on his Facebook page and asked followers: "What airport is this?"

Louisville Nissan dealer Doug Wolford wasn't amused.

The chairman of the Kentucky Automobile Dealers Association responded, telling Cardone that he should be writing about the Brownback amendment, whichwould exempt dealers from a sweeping federal financial regulation bill. He also told Cardone that if the amendment didn't pass, "You might as well pack your tent because you're going out of business like half the dealers in this country."

Cardone wasn't familiar with the issue. At 11 p.m. he was on the phone with Wolford, who happily educated him.

By 3 a.m., Cardone had shot and posted on YouTube a video of himself urging his clients and friends -- furniture dealers, mortgage brokers and Hollywood producers and actors -- to call their senators in support of the amendment. And he had written and posted a call to action article on the Huffington Post Web site.

The video received 1,300 hits in the first 24 hours. The article was reposted on about 200 other blog sites, Cardone says. He wrote about the issue on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and other social media sites at least once a day through May 22.

Impressed with Cardone's use of social media, Wolfold asked the governor of Kentucky to bestow on the trainer a Kentucky Colonel Award "for giving back to business and society."

Cardone says car dealers have supported him for years. "If I don't fight for them, then what's the purpose?" he says.

But this isn't the end of the story.

Wolford sent a similar e-mail to another consultant. He told the consultant to stop talking about tomatoes on his Facebook page and get behind the Brownback amendment.

Wolford says that person cursed him out and un-friended him.