The proud and the shunned

This thought from a veteran auto observer in our nation's capital:

General Motors does far more harm to its chances of survival by allowing the constant drip, drip, drip of bad news -- much of it attributed to anonymous sources -- instead of coming out publicly, laying its cards on the table and saying, "we need help."

That's true, of course.

But there are a couple of issues at play.

1. GM execs are proud people who never like to admit that they need help, even when they know they really, really need help.

2. Why shouldn't GM CEO Rick Wagoner tell his company's story directly to President Bush at the White House instead of having to visit with bureaucrats and technocrats?

The apparent cold shoulder the company has received from the Bush White House is baffling, especially since seven years ago GM's "Keep America Rolling" incentives saved the U.S. economy in the days after 9/11.

Turnabout might be fair play, even in Washington. But from here in the Heartland, you'd never know it.

Remember: What's good for America is good for General Motors.

And vice versa.

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