Debating Toyota's 'keep 'em working' move

The story on Toyota keeping its San Antonio plant's workers employed on a retraining program during a three-month shutdown is drawing the most comment today.

EJV007 blasts Detroit 3 "die hard" critics and counters that "Toyota produces an industry-leading full-size pickup built in North America by North Americans."

At least one writer believes Toyota's move is simply a ploy to prevent workers from unionizing, saying "Toyota will do ANYTHING to keep the union out of its plants."

COO@Tier1 counters that Toyota ends up with well trained workers, no union and committed employees and asks: "Do you think Detroit could learn something from this example?"

Tom R asks why import brands get the credit for innovative ideas, noting that General Motors' Saturn brand made a similar move 18 years ago. He adds: "Just another 'copied' idea the Japanese get credit for."

Finally, Athena expresses impatience toward comments about this story that wander into debates about the relative quality of Toyota's pickup. The writer concludes: "Kudos to Toyota for keeping Americans working."

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