Lincoln pulls plug on 'Dreams' ads

Lincoln Mercury’s Brett Wheatley: “The ‘Dreams’ campaign served us well.”
WASHINGTON — Lincoln is scrapping its 2-year-old "Dreams" advertising campaign.

"Dreams" advertisements stopped running nationally last month. With the introduction of the new 2009 MKS sedan, the brand is shifting to a product-focused message.

"The 'Dreams' campaign served us well as an emotional campaign," said Brett Wheatley, general marketing manager for Lincoln Mercury. "But now that we've got some real solid product, we're going to be putting a little more emphasis on the actual product attributes."

Lincoln is aiming MKS advertising at Generation X consumers. TV commercials for the car, shown, began this month.
In addition to the MKS, Lincoln has added the MKX crossover and the smaller MKZ sedan in the past few years. Lincoln sales rose 9.1 percent in 2007 to 131,487 but are down 22.5 percent through the first five months of this year.

The "Dreams" campaign launched in 2006 with TV commercials focused on people pursuing individual goals. Appearing in the ads were celebrities such as musician Harry Connick Jr. and basketball player Dwyane Wade.

Lincoln doesn't need to replace the ads with a new brand campaign, Wheatley said. New product-focused spots will be targeted toward younger buyers.

MKS advertising is aimed at Generation X consumers in their 30s to mid-40s. TV commercials began this month, and the car is expected in dealerships by late June. MKS ads focus on the car's technology and include the brand's "Reach Higher" tag line, in use since 2005.

You can reach Amy Wilson at awilson@crain.com

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