9 U.S. Toyota executives will retire

Nine Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. executives are retiring from the company.

No replacements have been named, but Toyota spokesman Xavier Dominicis said the automaker has a "deep bench of seasoned executives" who will fill at least some of the vacant slots starting this summer.

Among the nine retiring is Dave Illingworth, 64, senior vice president and chief administrative officer. Illingworth, a 30-year Toyota veteran, played a key role in launching Lexus, the automaker's luxury brand. He also held senior management positions in sales, finance, marketing and strategic and product planning.

Also retiring is Jim Aust, 64, Toyota's vice president of motorsports and president and CEO of Toyota Racing Development, the automaker's performance-parts division. Aust, a 31-year employee, oversaw Toyota's successful NASCAR Craftsmen Truck Series debut and Toyota's move into NASCAR's stock car racing Sprint Cup and Nationwide Series.

The longest serving executive to retire this summer is Dudley Hawley, 64, Toyota Motor Sales vice president, who has worked for Toyota since 1967.

Dominicis said the retirements had been planned. Most will retire July 1. He said some jobs may not be filled because of realignments of responsibilities and consolidations of departments.

The other executives retiring are:

-- Alan DeCarr, 56, group vice president and general manager of Toyota logistics.

-- Ken Goltara, 57, vice president of business technology services.

-- Mike Morrison, 53, vice president of the University of Toyota.

-- Marian Duntley, 59, corporate manager of customs.

-- Jim Finkel, 61, corporate manager of vehicle logistics administration and planning.

-- Gloria Jahn, 57, corporate manager of business support services.

You can reach Richard Truett at rtruett@crain.com

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