Kia wants 2% market share in Germany by 2008

The importer will spend 9 million euro to achieve 31,000-unit-a-year sales target

Magdeburg, Germany. Kia Motors Germany wants to boost its market share from 0.9 percent to a 2 percent in the next four years. By next year, the Korean brands aims to be Germany's 10th biggest, up from 13th out of 23, Kia Germany Managing Director Haydan Leshel told 400 dealers at a Kia convention here.

New Kia Germany President Kyung Ho Woo said the company is already ahead of Volkswagen in terms of profitability

Leshel wants Kia to sell 31,000 vehicles in Germany this year - an increase of about 15 compared with 2003. To do so the brand will have to sell 9,500 units.

The importer will help dealers reach that goal by contributing an additional 9 million euros to support Kia's zero percent finance scheme, which applies to selected models and offers a lease length of up to 60 months.

Leshel also wants to eliminate the current problem of a lack in available vehicles by the end of the year.

He said that strengthening Kia's dealer network is a priority. The goal is to add 20 more dealers before the end of the year, taking the total for 2003 to 56 and increasing the brand's presence in Germany to 250 dealers and 420 retail outlets.

Kia wants to boost average sales in Europe's biggest market to 150 units per dealer. At the moment, half of the Kia dealers sell less than 100 cars a year. Only six dealers achieve more than 500 units annually.

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