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Peugeot forecasts a sales boom with a fresh 407 and new small cars

Paris. Peugeot boss Frederic Saint-Geours is very optimistic about the brand's future, despite a drop in the Peugeot's unit sales in Europe during the first half of 2004.

Saint-Geours predicted that the new 407 would revive the Peugeot's sales significantly.

Peugeot also plans a subcompact car offensive with its new 1007 small car and a new city mini car, which will be built alongside Toyota models in eastern Europe.

Olivier Veyrier, managing director in Germany, expects major growth for the 407, which will also be available as station wagon. "We should be selling up to 25,000 units in Germany in 2005."

Veyrier hopes to sell more than Peugeot 140,000 cars in Germany this year and reach a market share of more than 4 percent. "A realistic goal," he said.

The 407 coupe, which was shown at the Geneva auto show earlier this year, will be launched at the end of 2005.

The trendy 1007, a car similar in size to the Mercedes A class will start the small car offensive. Electrically controlled sliding doors will be standard and the car will cost "between 13,000 and 14,000 euros," said Saint-Geours.

Peugeot product director Bruno de Guibert said: "The car has practically no competition, but will probably attract Smart and Mini customers."

He added: "We will run three shifts at the Poissy plant in the medium-term, so that we can build between 150,000 and 200,000 units of the 1007."

The Peugeot city mini car (project B0), which will cost approximately 8,000 euros, will be launched by May 2005. The car will be built at PSA and Toyota's joint venture factory in the Czech Republic.

There will also be changes in the current model series. From the first quarter of 2005 the 206 and 307 coupe convertibles will be available with PSA's1.6-liter HDI diesel engine.

Peugeot product director de Guibert said Peugeot will offer particle filters in all its diesel engines in the long-term.

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