Government office report: short-term registrations boost totals

Porsche also works with day registrations

Flensburg, Germany. Manufacturers and importers used approximately 36,300 short-term registrations in the first quarter of 2004 to dress up their German business. This is more than 4.74 percent of a total of 765,300 new registrations according to a study by the German Federal Motor Vehicle Registration Agency (KBA) in Flensburg. During the same period last year it was 4.71 percent, which is the equivalent of 37,100 units.

Renault is at the top of the statistics with 7,400 short-term registrations. It is followed closely by Volkswagen: the Wolfsburg-based company turned 6,900 vehicles -- 4.91 percent of their new registrations -- into "young used cars." The cars are then sold at higher discounts.

In percentage terms, MG Rover leads the list with 31.14 percent of all cars sold registered short-term.

Surprisingly two premium brands are also users of this unprofitable system: 161 units or 17.46 percent of a total of 920 newly-registered Jaguars were not sold directly to customers and of a total of 3,970 Porsches 411 units or 10.36 percent were short-term registrations. During the same quarter of 2003, Porsche's share in short-term registrations was 7.86 percent; Jaguar's was 12.28 percent.

Also surprising: Opel is currently the manufacturer with the smallest number of day registrations. Only 463 units of the total of 77,800 new registrations were short-term registrations, which is a share of 0.6 percent.

Other manufacturers that stayed below the 2 percent mark are Peugeot (1.72 percent), Seat (1.48), Skoda (1.33) and Volvo (1.93).

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